cover

Will Staehle Discusses his Cover Design for Sarah Gailey's Magic for Liars

I’ve worked with the talented creative team over at Tor on countless covers, and I’m always thrilled when they approach me with a new project. Magic for Liars came across my desk at a particularly busy time for me, but the book concept was really interesting, and I was excited to take the project on.

This fantastic debut novel from Sarah Gailey follows our lead, Ivy Gamble. When a gruesome murder is discovered at The Osthorne Academy of Young Mages where Ivy’s estranged twin sister teaches Theoretical Magic - Ivy ( a reluctant detective ) is pulled into a world of untold power and dangerous secrets. She will have to find a murderer and reclaim her sister―without losing herself.

Will Staehle Discusses his Cover Design for Sarah Gailey's Magic for Liars

Kelly Winton on Designing The Paper Wasp

The cover design for The Paper Wasp came together very organically. I was hired as a freelancer by Grove Atlantic’s Art Director Gretchen Mergenthaler. The cover memo had some specific direction, but Gretchen always encourages original ideas and experimentation and it sounded like a great project. I was excited to work on it.

Kelly Winton on Designing The Paper Wasp

Jakob Vala Explores the World of Taxidermy for Mostly Dead Things

Mostly Dead Things tells the story of Jessa-Lynn Morton, who takes over her father’s taxidermy business shortly after his suicide. Still grieving, she struggles to keep both the business and her family from falling apart. While Jessa buries herself in work and alcohol, her mother begins making lewd window displays with animals from the taxidermy shop. Jessa's first love—also her brother Milo’s wife—ran out on the family years before, leaving Milo with their young daughter and her troubled son from a previous relationship. Struggling to cope with her absence, Jessa and Milo remain locked in a pattern of resentment and grief.

Jakob Vala Explores the World of Taxidermy for Mostly Dead Things

Spine Podcast, Season 3, Episode 5: Mark Campbell

For this episode Holly Dunn interviews Mark Campbell, Head of Design at HarperCollins Australia and New Zealand, and President of the Australian Book Designers Association (ABDA.) They have an in-depth conversation on the working relationship between art director and designer. They also review results from a survey conducted by the ABDA in 2018. The survey’s focus was of the work experience among the ABDA book-design community, covering things such as contracts and revisions.

Spine Podcast, Season 3, Episode 5: Mark Campbell

Emily Courdelle on Designing Is Butter a Carb?

I designed the cover for Is Butter a Carb? while I was working in-house as a junior designer with the wonderful design team at Little, Brown Book Group. I put myself forward for this project in the cover briefing for two main reasons: 1) the title (who doesn’t love a Mean Girls reference?), and 2) that I felt this project could give me a chance to experiment with my love for hand/digital lettering.

Emily Courdelle on Designing Is Butter a Carb?

A Look at International Editions

When a book originally written in English is translated for a new audience it often requires a new cover to go with it. Some of these are very similar, taking elements from the English version, while others are vastly different. It's difficult to draw any conclusions about how these markets differ from the UK or US simply by looking at these covers. That would require a lot more research, comparison and conversation with designers. (PhD thesis, anyone?) In this article, I've instead tried to focus on the objective design choices that have been made rather than judging them as better or worse. Just as with US vs UK covers, I don't think that's a useful conversation. Moreover, it's impossible with the markets being as different as they are.

A Look at International Editions

Baily Crawford Tackles a Sensitive Subject for On a Scale of 1 to 10

On a Scale of One to Ten by Ceylan Scott gives us a look inside life in a psychiatric ward through the eyes of teenage Tamar. Based on the author’s true story, it is as poetic as it is unflinchingly honest. With themes of depression, self mutilation and suicide, the cover had to be intriguing while remaining respectful of the content. The read is deeply emotive, raw and beautiful; I wanted to encompass these qualities while also remaining accessible, considerate to the reality that a manuscript this dense with hard-hitting subject matter can provide important refuge to so many readers.

Baily Crawford Tackles a Sensitive Subject for On a Scale of 1 to 10

Lauren Peters-Collaer gets Creative with Collage for Feast Your Eyes

Feast Your Eyes by Myla Goldberg is an arresting and deeply compelling novel. It tells the story of Lillian Preston—a single mother and photographer searching for artistic recognition in 1950s New York City—and is formatted as if it were a catalogue of notes from a posthumous MoMA exhibition of her work. The “catalogue”, written largely in the voice of Lillian’s daughter Samantha, describes her mother’s life, including a show at a small gallery early in Lillian’s career where a display of partially nude photos of a young Samantha leads to obscenity charges, Lillian’s arrest, and mother and daughter becoming a lightning rod for national scrutiny and scorn. I was mesmerized by Feast Your Eyes immediately so was simultaneously incredibly grateful to my art director, Jaya Miceli, for giving it to me, and terrified at the thought of not doing it visual justice.

Lauren Peters-Collaer gets Creative with Collage for Feast Your Eyes

Luke Bird Designs an Offbeat cover for Plume

Currently, it seems I am irrevocably drawn to contemporary literary fiction with a touch of (oft-dark) humour. Plume is a brilliant novel. I find that designing a book that you really like can feel a little daunting. It sometimes feels as if there is an added internal pressure to get it just right. 

I was pleased to see that the brief from 4th Estate was quite open. Julian Humphries, who commissioned the cover, described it as being very cool, and said that I should feel free to take some risks. Interestingly, he suggested that I “think ABCDs”, referencing the ABCD book cover design awards in the UK. As a cover designer, briefs don’t get much better than this. I felt it could be an opportunity to create something really striking and design-led, which was a pure reaction to reading the novel.

Luke Bird Designs an Offbeat cover for Plume

Faceout Studio's Jeff Miller Explores Russian Folk Patterns for Romanov

The cover for Romanov actually came together more quickly than expected. Some cover projects just present themselves that way. You immediately get the creative juices flowing and have imagery and/or art in mind that propels you in overdrive. There’s almost a good anxiety that takes place where you’re desperate to see things come together. That was the case here.

Faceout Studio's Jeff Miller Explores Russian Folk Patterns for Romanov

Steve Leard Plays With Perspective for The Mountain That Eats Men

The Mountain That Eats Men (Zed Books, 2019) is the haunting story of Cerro Rico, a mining mountain near Potosí, Bolivia. 

From the 16th century, the mines of Potosí bankrolled the Spanish empire. During those years immense wealth allowed the city to grow larger than London at the time and the mountain was quickly given the epithet Cerro Rico – the ‘rich mountain’. But today, Potosí’s inhabitants are some of the poorest in South America while the mountain itself has been so greedily plundered that its summit is on the verge of collapsing. So many people have died in the mines that Cerro Rico is now called the ‘mountain that eats men’.

Steve Leard Plays With Perspective for The Mountain That Eats Men

Nicolette Seeback on Designing the Luminous Cover for Trust Exercise

Designing the cover for Trust Exercise was a unique experience for me because I didn’t have the chance to read the manuscript before I started working on it. This was because the project wasn’t initially assigned to me, but I had been attending jacket meetings where many beautiful designs were being presented, none of which were being approved. I had been listening to the feedback on the other designs, while also learning some clues about the book itself during this time. When I was asked to contribute some designs to show in the next round, I thought about all that I had heard, and my first instinct was to experiment with intimate figure drawings. I had heard that sex and consent were themes in the book but I hadn’t yet seen any covers exploring the body, so I set out to fill that gap. I used crayons, thick markers and various other pens to create line drawings on paper that I scanned and vectorized. I treated each of these designs very similarly by placing large type in the center and weaving the illustrations through the letters. These comps were liked by some but ultimately killed because they weren’t quite right for the book.

Nicolette Seeback on Designing the Luminous Cover for Trust Exercise

Jack Smyth Creates a Bold Cover for The Half-God of Rainfall

Inua Ellam’s The Half God of Rainfall is a modern take on ancient mythology / basketball saga which is part poem / part play. It’s about as far away from a regular piece of fiction as you can get, and I really wanted to try make it feel different in the way the cover was approached.

From the get go, Jo Walker’s wonderful covers for Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s paperbacks were a loose reference, so I kept things graphic and pattern based.

Jack Smyth Creates a Bold Cover for The Half-God of Rainfall

Spine Podcast, Season 3, Episode 2: Lauren Panepinto

For this episode Holly Dunn interviews Creative Director/VP for Orbit Books, Lauren Panepinto. They discuss how she came to be at Orbit, artist collaboration, and cover design for science fiction/fantasy books. You can view more of Panepinto's work at www.laurenpanepinto.com.

Spine Podcast, Season 3, Episode 2:  Lauren Panepinto

Artist Cristina Pagnoncelli Breaks Out the Inks for We Set the Dark on Fire

In December of 2017 I was hired by HarperCollins - one of the largest publishers in the world and the English language - to do lettering for the cover of a new book by a young writer. I read the book's digital preview and quickly devoured the 304 pages. I fell in love with the history - which is fanciful but parallels very closely with our current society (machismo, xenophobia and class conflict). Only after absorbing the whole plot, I set out for visual research. The briefing asked to bring some Mexican / Spanish character to the lettering since the story is about immigrant characters.

Artist Cristina Pagnoncelli Breaks Out the Inks for We Set the Dark on Fire

Sarahmay Wilkinson on her Incredible Design for the Cover of House of Stone

Some stories read like beautiful, bitter medicine. Novuyo Rosa Tshuma’s first novel House of Stone, a multifaceted and fragmented reflection on Zimbabwe’s harrowing past, is one of those stories. The novel oozes intensity, even terror. It’s magnificently composed, but it’s also so raw it might cut you. When designer Sarahmay Wilkinson, who currently serves as Associate Art Director at W.W. Norton, received the creative brief for the cover of House of Stone, she knew the project would be challenging. How does one wrap a biting story in shelf appeal?

Sarahmay Wilkinson on her Incredible Design for the Cover of House of Stone

Spine Podcast, Season 3, Episode 1: Kristen Radtke

For this first episode of Season 3 of our podcast Holly Dunn interviews cover designer, graphic novelist, and Art Director, Kristen Radtke. The conversation includes Radtke’s process on design, writing Imagine Wanting Only This, and how she works with other artists for The Believer Magazine.

Spine Podcast, Season 3, Episode 1: Kristen Radtke

Greg Heinimann Explores Photography and Illustration for The Other Americans

The Other Americans by Laila Lalami is a novel about the fallout from a hit-and-run accident involving a Moroccan immigrant man in modern day California. It features multiple narrators tied together through their connection to the event, the cover up that follows, and the strength of the deceased’s family in dealing with such a trauma.

The brief was fairly simple in that it asked to convey the mystery behind the accident, and should be photographic. A small-town nighttime scene with illuminated windows was suggested, or perhaps the intersection where the crime took place.

Greg Heinimann Explores Photography and Illustration for The Other Americans

Samira Iravani on Creating the Cover for Dig

The process of designing Dig started with all my favorite ingredients: an editor with a clear vision for the cover and a story I could really sink my teeth into. Dig, written by the brilliant A.S. King, is about five teens—The Shoveler, the Freak, CanIHelpYou?, Loretta the Flea-Circus Ring Mistress, and First-Class Malcolm. Confused? Good. The less you know about Dig the better. Let the teens help you tunnel your way out of the dark as they discover how their lives and the lives of millionaire former potato farmers, Marla and Gottfried Hemmings, intersect. The former title of the book, Blend & Strain, also tells you a little bit about what you’ll encounter in its pages. Blend your cast of characters together, then strain, to see what comes out of the chaos.

Samira Iravani on Creating the Cover for Dig

ABCD 2019 Winners!

Judging by the amount of empty cups dotted around the room, a good time was had by all at last night’s Academy of British Cover Design awards; in particular, by those talented ten who won a coveted ABCD book.

All the shortlisted covers were nothing but exceptional and Spine would like to congratulate everyone who entered.

And now, without further ado, here are the winners!

ABCD 2019 Winners!

Go Ask Alice C. Morse

If you love book covers, you can thank the British and American Arts and Crafts movements of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. If you love book covers with both historic and modern elements of design, you can thank Alice C. Morse, an American artist, designer, and teacher whose work in bookmaking went far beyond the cover. Morse, who also illustrated books and experimented with various bookbinding techniques, knew the artistic and commercial value of exceptional book design. Her legacy? Enchanting, inspiring designs that echo the emphasis of the Arts and Crafts movement: beauty and (and in) practicality.

Go Ask Alice C. Morse

Lauren Harms Creates a Hot Cover for This is Not a Love Song

Looking back on my design process for This is Not a Love Song, I realized that my thinking didn't start with the manuscript. It started with Brendan Mathew's first book, The World of Tomorrow, which I had had the great pleasure of reading and designing the cover for in 2016. 

It's interesting to compare these two books because they're wildly different. The World of Tomorrow is a fantastically fun, fast paced novel set around the 1939 World's Fair. A very specific setting and time period, that had a clear visual vocabulary. This is Not a Love Song is a set of contemporary short stories that are much more meditative. As with most story collections, there are a wide range of settings and characters to dive into. 

Lauren Harms Creates a Hot Cover for This is Not a Love Song

Katie Tooke Delves into the Past to Create The Glovemaker

The book is set in Utah, 1888 in Mormon country. A woman awaits her husband's long anticipated return home, but a stranger arrives at her doorstep and with him, trouble.

As usual when I start a book cover design I read the book. Then I started on my research looking at images around the subject matter, old posters, old rugs/tapestries from the era and place. I looked at anything I could find from 1888 Utah. 

Katie Tooke Delves into the Past to Create The Glovemaker